UK Siamese and Orientals kittens
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UK Siamese and Orientals kittens - FAQ banner UK Siamese and Orientals kittens - FAQ banner UK Siamese and Orientals kittens - FAQ banner
 
Contents
Q1. What does 'a pedigree cat' mean?
Q2. What paperwork should I expect to receive with my kitten?
Q3. What is the difference between a Siamese and an Oriental Shorthair?
Q4. Are Orientals and Siamese equally people orientated and outrageous?
Q5. How is it that there are Siamese and Orientals is the same litter?
Q6. Can I show my Oriental, or Siamese from an Oriental mating?
Q7. Are they healthy?
Q8. Are they more difficult to care for than other breeds?
Q9. Can I let them out?
Q10. How can I find out which breed number correspondences to what colour?
Download this kitten guide as an Adobe PDF
 
Q1. What does 'a pedigree cat' mean?Return to top
A dictionary definition is 'having a known line of descent' in other words, one knows who the cat's parents, grand parents, great grand parents etc were; the cat has a documented family - a 'known line of descent' - a pedigree
Q2. What paperwork should I expect to receive with my kitten?Return to top
A written pedigree showing a least four generations.

A registration certificate enabling the new owner to re-register the cat in their own name, should they so wish (most cats are registered with the GCCF - Governing Council of the Cat Fancy)

A vaccination certificate (two dated entries) against Cat Flu and Enteritus will be provided. Some breeders will also vaccinate against Leukaemia and Chlamydia.

A diet sheet, indicating the cat's present daily intake, with details of the cat's preferred variety of foods offered. This diet should be adhered to, initially, to prevent diarrhoea due to a change of diet and any changes gradually made

Many breeders will also include a six-week kitten insurance.

Q3. What is the difference between a Siamese and an Oriental Shorthair? Return to top
Briefly, the Siamese is an elegant cat, long and lithe with slim legs and tail, neat paws, a wedge shaped head with large ears and oriental shaped, blue eyes and the familiar 'pointed' coat pattern in a variety of colours

An Oriental is a Siamese wearing a different overcoat. Turned on its head, a Siamese is an Oriental with a particular coat pattern. In a Siamese, the coat colour is shown on the cold parts of the body ie the 'points' and should show a good contrast between the paler body and the darker colour on the points. An Oriental does not possess the gene responsible for the 'pointed' coat pattern and so the cat becomes the colour of the points entirely and looses the blue eyes, which become green

Thus, your Seal Point becomes an all black cat (with green eyes) known as an Oriental Black, your Lilac Point an Oriental Lilac and so on through the colours. Just to add a little confusion, for historical reasons the Chocolate Point equivalent Oriental is known as a Havana

Spotted, Classic, Ticked and Mackerel patterned Oriental tabbies are also available, as are Shaded and Smokes, - all in a glorious range of colours!

Q4. Are Orientals and Siamese equally people orientated and outrageous?Return to top
Yes. Obviously every kitten is an individual with his/her own personality, additionally early stimulation and handling will assist in producing a well-adjusted pet.
Q5. How is it that there are Siamese and Orientals is the same litter?Return to top
Many breeders of Orientals will use Siamese studs and it is not unusual, even if both parents are Orientals, for both to 'carry' the Siamese coat pattern, resulting in a litter containing both Siamese and Oriental coat patterned kittens, all with the same good looks and personalities
Q6. Can I show my Oriental, or Siamese from an Oriental mating?Return to top
Yes, usually, most colours/patterns of Oriental are of Championship status and those not are well on the way. Some Oriental 'colourways' are not recognised in the Siamese, so those will have on their registration certificates, from the GCCF (Governing Council of the Cat Fancy) the words 'this cat may not be shown' they will, however, be registered and are as 'pedigree' as their Oriental litter mates
Q7. Are they healthy?Return to top
Any kitten, no matter whether a pedigree or a moggie, needs the same healthy start in life, ie bred from good healthy stock and well fed and handled. Many Siamese and Orientals live to a ripe old age, some don't, unfortunately, but then neither do some ordinary pussies
Q8. Are they more difficult to care for than other breeds?
No, all cats should have good, regular meals, a warm bed and a loving home. A sensible, mixed diet should be provided, - feeding the same thing for every meal must be very boring for the cat and could be rather a problem, should the particular food become unobtainable, or the manufacturer change the recipe. Dried, tinned and fresh food, all have their place in a mixed diet

Clean water should always be available - Siamese and Orientals seem to drink more water than most moggies. Milk is not required and may cause diarrhoea, not just in Orientals

They do, however, require more warmth than ordinary cats. Siamese and Orientals are built for hot climes. They have slim bodies, huge ears and very short, fine fur; your average domestic cat is an entirely different shape, cobby, solid, with small ears and even in the shorthair a good thick coat; a cat developed to cope with colder climes. On radiators, in airing cupboards, next to the boiler, under the duvet are the preferred beds of your average Oriental/Siamese, even during the warmest weather. Electrically heated pads are available and are greatly appreciated, leading to a more contented cat who will complain less when the central heating goes off!

Q9. Can I let them out?Return to top
An individual choice. Obviously the dangers need to be considered. Being involved in a traffic accident, fights with other cats (not only the wounds but the transferring of diseases) chased by dogs, lost, stolen - the list goes on.
However, if it is decided that the risk is worth taking, it should be remembered that a cat is many times more vulnerable at night and should, therefore, be safely indoors and that even during the day an inquisitive, bored animal, left to its own devices can get itself into scrapes, so putting puss out whilst one is at work and not there, regularly to check the cat's whereabouts, is not sensible

Construction of an outside 'run' is one popular solution; the cat gets some fresh air and sunshine, his 'owners' peace of mind

Provided they are warm and entertained, either by their owners or another animal, the vast majority of Siamese or Orientals are content to be indoor cats; a single cat left alone for long periods is a very sad individual who may either become ill or start to display unacceptable behaviour. In any case, two Orientals playing together, chasing each other, sleeping together is most entertaining for the owners and in no way reduces the affection between cat and owner.
Q10. How can I find out which breed number correspondences to what colour?Return to top
You can find a complete list of breed numbers and their colours here.
 

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